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dc.contributor.authorDiken, Bülent
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-27T11:55:45Z
dc.date.available2021-01-27T11:55:45Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0263-2764
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0263276420978289en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12469/3748
dc.description.abstractI treat despotism as a virtual concept. Thus it is necessary to expose its actualizations even when it appears as its opposite, refusing to recognize itself as despotism. I define despotism initially as arbitrary rule, in terms of a monstrous transgression of the law. But since the monster is grounded in its very formlessness, it cannot be demonstrated. However, one can always try to de-monstrate it through disagreements. In doing this, I deal with despotism not as a solipsistic undertaking but as part of a constellation that always already contains two other elements: economy and voluntary servitude. I give three different – ancient, early modern and late modern – accounts of this nexus, demonstrating how despotism continuously takes on new appearances. I conclude, in a counter-classical prism, how the classical nexus has evolved in modernity while the focus gradually shifted towards another triangulation: neo-despotism, use and dissent.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectDespotismen_US
dc.subjectFree willen_US
dc.subjectNeo-despotismen_US
dc.subjectSecuritizationen_US
dc.subjectVoluntary servitudeen_US
dc.titleNeo-Despotism as Anti-Despotismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.journalTheory, Culture & Societyen_US
dc.identifier.wos000610312300001en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0263276420978289en_US
dc.contributor.khasauthorDiken, Bülenten_US


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