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dc.contributor.authorÇörekçioğlu, Gözde
dc.contributor.authorFrancesconi, Marco
dc.contributor.authorKunze, Astrid
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-22T14:56:24Z
dc.date.available2021-07-22T14:56:24Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn0266-903X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12469/4085
dc.description.abstractGenerous government-mandated parental leave is generally viewed as an effective policy to support women's careers around childbirth. But does it help women to reach top positions in the upper pay echelon of their firms? Using longitudinal employer-employee matched data for the entire Norwegian population, we address this question exploiting a series of reforms that expanded paid leave from 30 weeks in 1989 to 52 weeks in 1993. The representation of women in top positions has only moderately increased over time, and career profiles of female top earners within firms are significantly different from those of their male counterparts. The reforms did not affect, and possibly decreased, the probability for women to be at the top over their life cycle. We discuss some implications of this result to put into perspective the design of new family-friendly policy interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.subjecttop earnersen_US
dc.subjectparental leaveen_US
dc.subjectwomenen_US
dc.subjectregression discontinuityen_US
dc.titleDo generous parental leave policies help top female earners?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.startpage882en_US
dc.identifier.endpage902en_US
dc.relation.journalOXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICYen_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.wos000635344800008en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/oxrep/graa047en_US
dc.contributor.khasauthorÇörekçioğlu, Gözdeen_US


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